Tag Archives: Who was Meng Zhifan

Contemporary figures in the Analects of Confucius: Meng Zhifan

Meng Zhifan (孟之反) was a minister of the state of Lu who was known for his modesty and self-deprecating humor. 

According to an account in the Chronicle of Zuo (左傳/ Zuǒzhuán), in 485 BCE he led an army that was soundly defeated by a force from the state of Qi in a battle that took place near to Qufu, the capital of Lu. During the retreat he showed great valor by fighting off the enemy in an effective rearguard action that allowed his surviving soldiers to escape. Continue reading Contemporary figures in the Analects of Confucius: Meng Zhifan

Leadership lessons from Confucius: when the chips are down

when the chips are down

子曰:「孟之反不伐,奔而殿,將入門,策其馬,曰:「『非敢後也,馬不進也。』」
Confucius said: “Meng Zhifan isn’t given to boasting. When he and his soldiers were in retreat, he stayed with the rearguard. It was only when they reached the city gate that he spurred his horse and said: ‘It wasn’t courage that kept me at the rear. My horse wouldn’t run.’” (1)

If you’re willing to put yourself in the firing line, your people will be more than happy to fight the good fight alongside you. They’ll be even more willing to support you if you refuse to play the hero and downplay any contribution you make with a self-deprecating joke or two. Continue reading Leadership lessons from Confucius: when the chips are down