Tag Archives: Huan Tui

Followers of Confucius: Sima Niu

Despite making just three appearances in the Analects, Sima Niu (司馬牛) succeeded in keeping his name preserved for posterity while many far more deserving figures had theirs disappear into obscurity.

It’s not as if he comes up with any stunning intellectual or ethical insights in the three brief and rather melodramatic appearance he makes in Book 12 of the Analects either. At best, he functions as a foil for Confucius to expound in detail on the nature of goodness and leadership and for Zixia to utter the famous phrase: “within the four seas all men are brothers” – which ironically is often misattributed to the sage himself rather than his dour follower! Continue reading Followers of Confucius: Sima Niu

Leadership lessons from Confucius: ignore your stage fright

stage fright

司馬牛問君子。子曰:「君子不憂不懼。」曰:「不憂不懼,斯謂之君子矣乎?」子曰:「內省不疚,夫何憂何懼?」
Sima Niu asked: “What makes a leader?” Confucius said: “A leader has no anxiety or fear.” Sima Niu said: “No anxiety or fear? That’s what makes a leader?” Confucius said: “When he looks inside himself and finds nothing wrong, what does he have to be anxious about or fear?”

It’s natural to suffer from stage fright when you’re about to embark on a major project. Of course your mind’s going to be filled with doubts about whether you have the ability to execute it, but as long as you know you’re doing the right thing ignore the butterflies in your stomach and move ahead with it. Continue reading Leadership lessons from Confucius: ignore your stage fright

Leadership Lessons from Confucius: talk is cheap

talk is cheap

司馬牛問仁。子曰:「仁者,其言也訒。」曰:「斯言也訒,斯謂之仁矣乎?」子曰:「為之難,言之得無訒乎?」
Sima Niu asked about goodness. Confucius said: “A person who practices goodness is cautious in speech.” Sima Niu said: “Cautious in speech? Is that what you call goodness?” Confucius said: “When something is difficult to do, how is it possible not to be cautious in speaking about it?”

Talk is cheap. Better to wait until you have clarified your thoughts on a major decision before sharing them with others. The earlier you talk, the greater the risk you’ll end up confusing and perhaps even disappointing people – not mention getting yourself into unnecessary trouble. Continue reading Leadership Lessons from Confucius: talk is cheap

Analects of Confucius Book 7: hopes and dreams of Confucius

hopes and dreams of Confucius

What were the hopes and dreams of Confucius? What kept him plugging away despite the many setbacks he suffered during his career as a government official in his home state of Lu and his subsequent fourteen years of exile?

The first chapter of Book 7 of the Analects gives us a hint when he famously declares: “I transmit but I don’t create. I am faithful to and love the past.” On the surface, Confucius may appear to be speaking modestly about his own abilities and ambitions, but in reality he’s revealing that his ultimate dream is to restore the lost glories of the early Zhou dynasty when it was ruled by his great hero, the Duke of Zhou. Continue reading Analects of Confucius Book 7: hopes and dreams of Confucius

Analects of Confucius Book 7: by numbers

Analects of Confucius Book 7 by numbers

Since Book 7 of the Analects is focused on Confucius, his interactions with his followers are limited compared to the previous two books. Of the six followers that are featured, Zilu makes the most appearances with three. Yan Hui, Ran Qiu, Zigong, Gongxi Chi, and Wuma Qi are limited to one. Continue reading Analects of Confucius Book 7: by numbers