Tag Archives: Confucius on Ran Yong

Leadership lessons from Confucius: the spirits of the hills and rivers

spirits of the hills and rivers

子謂仲弓,曰:「犁牛之子騂且角,雖欲勿用,山川其舍諸?」
Confucius said of Ran Yong: “Some might hesitate to choose the offspring of a plow ox for a sacrifice, but if a bullock has fine horns and sports a ruddy coat would the spirits of the hills and rivers reject it?”

Don’t judge a book by its cover. Open it up and learn more about what it has to say. The same principle applies to identifying talent. Just because someone didn’t go to a well-known university or doesn’t speak in a polished accent, that doesn’t mean that they lack the ability and drive to be successful. Indeed, the reverse is often the case, because such people are often more eager to prove themselves than ones who followed the conventional educational path. Continue reading Leadership lessons from Confucius: the spirits of the hills and rivers

Leadership Lessons from Confucius: a seat facing south

a seat facing south

子曰:「雍也可使南面。」
Confucius said: “Ran Yong could take a seat facing south.” (1)

How would you describe your leadership style? Would you say it is hands-off because you empower your staff to carry out their jobs with a minimum of interference? Or would you say it is hands-on because you insist on carefully reviewing your staff’s work and making sure they follow strict procedures. Continue reading Leadership Lessons from Confucius: a seat facing south

Leadership lessons from Confucius: what use is eloquence?

what use is eloquence?

或曰:「雍也仁而不佞。」子曰:「焉用佞?御人以口給,屢憎於人。不知其仁,焉用佞?」
Someone said: “Ran Yong is good but not eloquent.” Confucius said: “What use is eloquence? A smooth tongue creates many enemies. I don’t know whether Ran Yong is good; but he definitely has no need for eloquence.” (1)

The ability to speak clearly and persuasively is vital for getting on in the world no matter what profession you are in. People who speak confidently are far more likely to be regarded more favorably than their shy or tongue-twisted counterparts even though they probably know a lot less about what they are talking about than the ones who sit quietly besides them. Continue reading Leadership lessons from Confucius: what use is eloquence?