Tag Archives: Confucius on mourning

Analects of Confucius Book 7: resources

Here is a list of resources covering Book 7 of the Analects of Confucius. You can click on the links below to learn more about the main themes of the book:

Analects of Confucius Book 7: translation

Here is a list of articles I have written about each chapter in the book. Again, click on the links to learn more. Continue reading Analects of Confucius Book 7: resources

Analects of Confucius Book 7: new English translation

Read this new English translation of the Analects of Confucius Book 7 to learn more about the teachings of China’s most famous philosopher. It provides a vivid portrait of the sage’s personality and motivations, as well as his opinions on various followers and other contemporary and historical figures.

Chapter 1
子曰:「述而不作,信而好古,竊比於我老彭。」
Confucius said: “I transmit but I don’t create. I am faithful to and love the past. In this respect, I dare to compare myself with Old Peng.”
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Leadership lessons from Confucius: on dining with someone in mourning

mourning

子食於有喪者之側,未嘗飽也。子於是日哭,則不歌。
When Confucius dined with someone in mourning, he never ate his fill. On a day when he had been weeping, Confucius never sang. (1) (2)

When you attend a funeral or visit someone in mourning, your purpose is to pay your respects and offer your condolences. If you are offered something to eat and drink, you should of course accept the invitation but exercise restraint on how much you consume. You are there to show your empathy and support for the person who is grieving their loss – not to disturb the mood by drawing unnecessary attention to yourself. Continue reading Leadership lessons from Confucius: on dining with someone in mourning

Leadership Lessons from Confucius: vision and core values

core values

子曰:「三年無改於父之道,可謂孝矣。」
Confucius said: “If after three years a man has not deviated from his father’s path, then he may be called a filial son.”

Do you know the vision and core values of the organization that you work for? Although you might be able to dredge up a few garbled phrases from your memory banks, the likely answer to this question is no. There’s no shame in this. After all, you have more pressing issues to think about such as hitting your quarterly sales numbers or making sure your new product ships on time.

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