Tag Archives: Analects

Analects of Confucius Book 2: Confucius on ritual

Rites

Ritual can be best understood as a behavioral language that provides the grammar, syntax, and standard usage patterns that enable people to act in an appropriate way in any given situation – whether at a wedding, a funeral, a formal dinner, or a casual lunch. Continue reading Analects of Confucius Book 2: Confucius on ritual

Analects of Confucius Book 2: Confucius on balanced learning

learning

Confucius is almost universally (and unfairly) blamed for the style of rote-learning that has plagued Chinese education for millennia. In reality, however, he advocated a balanced and intellectually-rigorous approach to learning that remains highly relevant even today. Continue reading Analects of Confucius Book 2: Confucius on balanced learning

Analects of Confucius Book 1: Confucius on relationships

One of the most important themes of Book 1 of the Analects is that the focus of learning is on practical applications rather than dry academic theory. Its main objective was to ensure that a young man was inculcated with the right values and behaviors to ensure that he made a positive contribution to society by interacting positively with its other members. Continue reading Analects of Confucius Book 1: Confucius on relationships

Analects of Confucius Book 1: Confucius on motivation

Confucius never promised a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow for people who followed his way. He regarded it as everyone’s duty to cultivate their learning and behavior in line with his teachings. It probably never occurred to him to offer them any encouragement or incentives to help them along this lonely and difficult path. Continue reading Analects of Confucius Book 1: Confucius on motivation

Analects of Confucius Book 1: Confucius on affectation

Throughout the Analects, Confucius repeatedly raises his concerns about people who fail to back up their promises with meaningful actions and behave in superficial ways designed to impress their peers with their morality and kindness rather than out of any genuine desire to follow the principles that they purportedly ascribe to. Continue reading Analects of Confucius Book 1: Confucius on affectation