Category Archives: Confucius

Leadership lessons from Confucius: an extraordinary outburst

extraordinary outburst

季氏富於周公,而求也為之聚斂而附益之。子曰:「非吾徒也,小子鳴鼓而攻之可也!」
The head of the Ji Family was wealthier than the Duke of Zhou ever was, but Ran Qiu still assisted him with the collection of taxes to further increase his wealth. Confucius said: “He’s no longer my follower. You may beat the drum and attack him, my young friends.”

There’s no point in exploding with anger when someone has done something that upsets you if they’re not actually there to hear you. It might make you feel good for a couple seconds, but pretty soon you’ll be left feeling sheepish along with everyone else who was there to witness your outburst – particularly if you go as far as to call for violence against someone you are close to. Continue reading Leadership lessons from Confucius: an extraordinary outburst

Leadership lessons from Confucius: both miss the mark

miss the mark

子貢問:「師與商也孰賢?」子曰:「師也過,商也不及。」曰:「然則師愈與?」子曰:「過猶不及。」
Zigong asked: “Who is better: Zizhang or Zixia?” Confucius said: “Zizhang overshoots the mark and Zixia falls short of the mark.” Zigong said: “Then Zizhang must be better?” Confucius said: “Both miss the mark.”

When does your greatest strength become your greatest weakness? This is a question you should think deeply about when analyzing your actions. Continue reading Leadership lessons from Confucius: both miss the mark

Leadership lessons from Confucius: putting someone under a cloud

under a cloud

子曰:「由之瑟,奚為於丘之門?」門人不敬子路。子曰:「由也升堂矣!未入於室也!」
Confucius said: “What is Zilu doing playing his zither inside my gate?” The followers ceased to treat Zilu with respect. Confucius said: “Zilu may not have entered the inner chamber yet, but he has at least ascended to the hall.” (1) (2)

If you have reason to criticize a member of your team, make sure you do so in private. This is not only respectful to the person concerned, but it also prevents gossip and rumors spreading through the office like wildfire. Loose lips can not only sink ships but also people’s reputations and even careers. Continue reading Leadership lessons from Confucius: putting someone under a cloud

Leadership lessons from Confucius: a bright shiny object

bright shiny object

魯人為長府。閔子騫曰:「仍舊貫,如之何?何必改作!」子曰:「夫人不言,言必有中。」
The leadership of Lu was planning to demolish the Long Treasury and rebuild it. Min Ziqian said: “Why not just repair the old structure? Why build a new one?” Confucius said: “This man rarely speaks, but when he does he hits the mark.” (1)

It’s always much more exciting to work on a new project than on an upgrade an existing one – not to mention more beneficial to your career because of the increased exposure it will give you. After all, who has time to pay attention to the poor suckers beavering away in the background when there’s a brand-new bright shiny object to gawp at? Continue reading Leadership lessons from Confucius: a bright shiny object

Leadership lessons from Confucius: close to the edge

close to the edge

閔子侍側,誾誾如也;子路,行行如也;冉有、子貢,侃侃如也。子樂。若由也,不得其死然。
When at Confucius’s side, Min Ziqian was straightforward but respectful; Zilu was bold and intense; Ran Qiu and Zigong were frank but amiable. Confucius was happy but said: “A man like Zilu won’t die a natural death.”

How well do you know your colleagues? Not just how good they are at their work, but their personal strengths, weaknesses, and character traits. Continue reading Leadership lessons from Confucius: close to the edge

Leadership lessons from Confucius: the here-and-now

the here-and-now

季路問事鬼神。子曰:「未能事人,焉能事鬼?」「敢問死?」曰:「未知生,焉知死?」
Zilu asked how to serve the spirits and gods. Confucius said: “If you’re not yet able to serve other people, how are you able to serve the spirits?” Zilu said: “May I ask about death?” Confucius said: “If you don’t understand life yet, how can you understand death?” (1) (2) (3)

Why waste precious time and energy worrying about things you can’t control when you have more than enough on your plate to deal with? Better to get the most out of your life by focusing on the here-and-now. That’s the only way to prepare for whatever happens when it comes to an end. Continue reading Leadership lessons from Confucius: the here-and-now

Leadership lessons from Confucius: not everything’s about you

Not everything’s about you

顏淵死,門人欲厚葬之,子曰:「不可。」門人厚葬之。子曰:「回也,視予猶父也,予不得視猶子也。非我也,夫二三子也。」
When Yan Hui died, his fellow followers wanted to give him a grand burial. Confucius said: “This isn’t right.” When the followers gave him a grand burial, Confucius said: “Yan Hui treated me like a father, but I was not given the chance to treat him like a son. This is not my fault, but yours, my friends.” (1)

If your team ever decides to disregard your advice or instructions, accept their decision with grace. Not everything’s about you. If there’s any blame to be apportioned, it should probably be placed on you for putting them into a position where they are given no choice but to ignore you. Continue reading Leadership lessons from Confucius: not everything’s about you

Leadership lessons from Confucius: a highly emotional state

highly emotional state

顏淵死,子哭之慟。從者曰:「子慟矣!」曰:「有慟乎!非夫人之為慟而誰為!」
When Yan Hui died, Confucius wailed bitterly with grief. His followers said: “Master, such grief is excessive.” Confucius said: “Is it excessive? If I don’t grieve for this man, who else should I grieve for?” (1)

When people are in a highly emotional state, it’s not the right time to intervene – much less pass judgment on their actions. Better to signal that you’re there for them if they need you and then allow them to work out their grief or anger on their own. There’s nothing you can say that will comfort or calm them down. Indeed, no matter how well-intentioned your intervention is, the chances are that it will only serve to fuel their emotions further. Continue reading Leadership lessons from Confucius: a highly emotional state

Leadership lessons from Confucius: letting your emotions show

letting your emotions show

顏淵死,子曰:「噫!天喪予!天喪予!」
When Yan Hui died, Confucius cried: “Alas! Heaven’s the ruin of me! Heaven’s the ruin of me!” (1)

How far should you go in masking your true emotions when disaster hits? Should you strive to remain calm and in control or is it OK to show your shock and grief with those around you? Continue reading Leadership lessons from Confucius: letting your emotions show

Analects of Confucius Book 11: resources

Here is a list of resources covering Book 10 of the Analects of Confucius. You can click on the links below to learn more about the main themes of the book:

Analects of Confucius Book 11: translation

Here is a list of articles I have written about each chapter in the book. Again, click on the links to learn more.

Leadership Lessons from Confucius: ingrained institutional loyalties
Leadership Lessons from Confucius: through thick and thin
Leadership Lessons from Confucius: your greatest strength
Leadership Lessons from Confucius: an interactive process
Leadership Lessons from Confucius: stick to your values
Leadership Lessons from Confucius: before opening your mouth
Leadership Lessons from Confucius: rose-tinted glasses
Leadership Lessons from Confucius: a special case?
Leadership Lessons from Confucius: letting your emotions show
Leadership Lessons from Confucius: a highly emotional state
Leadership Lessons from Confucius: not everything’s about you
Leadership Lessons from Confucius: the here-and-now
Leadership Lessons from Confucius: close to the edge