Tag Archives: filial piety

Daodejing Chapter 19: back to nature or back to basics?

Daodejing back to nature 

「絕聖棄智,民利百倍;絕仁棄義,民復孝慈;絕巧棄利,盜賊無有。此三者以為文不足,故令有所屬。見素抱樸,少私寡欲。」
Reject sophistry and discard knowledge;
The people will benefit a hundredfold.
Reject humanity and discard rightness,
And the people will rediscover filial piety and parental love.
Reject trickiness and renounce profit,
And there will be no thieves or bandits.
These three teachings are mere cultural adornments and inadequate.
The people need something that they can depend on.
Cherish simplicity and embrace the uncarved block of wood;
Reduce selfishness and minimize desires.
Continue reading Daodejing Chapter 19: back to nature or back to basics?

Analects Book 4: on filial piety

FilialPiety

Filial piety didn’t require blind obedience to your parents – at least not the version of it that Confucius taught. In Chapter XVIII of Book 4, he says that you may “gently remonstrate” with your mother and father if you think that they are not conducting themselves in the right manner. He does go on to caution, however, that if they choose to ignore your advice, you should “remain respectful” and not let “your efforts turn to resentment.” In the final analysis, maintaining harmony within the family is more important than being right. Continue reading Analects Book 4: on filial piety

Analects Book 4: Overview

Book 4 of the Analects begins with an exploration of the meaning of goodness. Only people who practice it constantly in their daily lives without a desire for personal profit are able to enjoy true satisfaction and contentment. “Small-minded men” who only pursue it for personal gain will never be truly fulfilled and happy. Continue reading Analects Book 4: Overview

Analects Book 1: on relationships

One of the most important themes of Book 1 of the Analects is that the focus of learning is on practical applications rather than dry academic theory. Its main objective was to ensure that a young man was inculcated with the right values and behaviors to ensure that he made a positive contribution to society by interacting positively with its other members. Continue reading Analects Book 1: on relationships

Analects Book 1: on loyalty

Loyalty

Loyalty (忠/zhōng) is one of what some commentators classify as the secondary virtues and is often mentioned together with trustworthiness (信/xìn). The first instance of this pairing can be found in Chapter VIII of Book 1 in which Confucius advised that a leader (君子) should, “Hold loyalty and trustworthiness as your highest principles.” Continue reading Analects Book 1: on loyalty

Analects Book 4 presentation

As with Book 2 and Book 3, Confucius dominates Book 4 of the Analects with the curious exceptions of Chapter XV and Chapter XXVI. The only plausible explanation for these two anomalies is that they were slipped in by an unscrupulous or careless editor.  Continue reading Analects Book 4 presentation

Analects Book 2 by numbers

I’ve added a statistical analysis to my Analects Book 2 SlideShare presentation. In contrast to Book 1, Confucius appears in all the book’s chapters, with the disciples that are featured acting as foils for the sage to make his pronouncements on the subjects of governance,  leadership, filial piety, and learning. Continue reading Analects Book 2 by numbers

Zengzi on filial piety

曾子曰:「吾聞諸夫子:『人未有自致者也,必也親喪乎!』
Zengzi said: “I heard this from the Master: If a man ever reveals his true nature, it’s when he mourns his parents.”

曾子曰:「吾聞諸夫子:『孟莊子之孝也,其他可能也,其不改父之臣與父之政,是難能也。」
Zengzi said: “I heard this from the Master: The one facet of Meng Zhuangzi’s filial piety that others couldn’t match was that he retained his father’s officials and continued his father’s policies.”

Zengzi is reiterating Confucius’s comments in Chapter XI of Book 1 and Chapter XX of Book 4 of the Analects that the true test of a son’s filial piety is whether he observes the three-year mourning period after the death of his parents: Continue reading Zengzi on filial piety