Analects Book 1: on learning

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Although this may come as a surprise to people who have experienced or even just heard about the rigors of China’s so-called “Confucian” education system, Confucius himself believed that learning should involve much more than simply imbibing and regurgitating the ancient classics. Rather, it should be focused on the practical application of the timeless principles found in them to your daily life so that you can make a positive contribution to your family, your community, and ultimately the whole society you live in. Continue reading Analects Book 1: on learning

Confucius on leadership presentation

As a follow-up to my recent post on the same subject, I’ve posted a presentation on slideshare summarizing some of the most important characteristics that Confucius believed a leader (君子/jūnzǐ) should possess using quotes from Book 1 of the Analects.

I’d love to hear any feedback you may have on it.  More presentations on the main themes of  Confucius’s teachings are in the pipeline.

 

Young pretenders and old companions: the disciples of Confucius in Book 1 of the Analects

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Confucius attracted quite a following during his lifetime as a result of his reputation as a great teacher. It is traditionally believed he had as many as three thousand students, though only seventy-two were said to have truly mastered his teachings. In Sima Qian’s Records of the Grand Historian (史記/shǐjì) Confucius himself is quoted as saying that he had seventy-seven “scholars of extraordinary ability” who were able to understand his “instructions”. Continue reading Young pretenders and old companions: the disciples of Confucius in Book 1 of the Analects